Author Archives: Dan

Pythagoras

One of the most famous mathematicians of the ancient world was Pythagoras of Samos (that town has now been renamed Pythagorion in his honor), born around 569 BCE.  Much mystery surrounds the early life of Pythagoras and it is sometimes difficults … Continue reading

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3000 BCE – 600 BCE: Early Medicine and the Hippocratic Oath

The earliest forms of prehistoric medicines (before the written word) were probably various herbs used by shamans or medicine men to heal the diseased person.  Fire was also likely used for sterilizing and closing wounds. The earliest known medical texts … Continue reading

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3500 BCE: Invention of the Wheel

Although we think of the wheel as a transportation device, it was originally used by ancient Mesopotamian potters as far back as 3500 BCE, and possible earlier.  It took another 300 or so years for the idea to be extended … Continue reading

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5500 BCE – 5000 BCE: Metallurgy

The importance of metallurgy on human culture is so important that scholars typically divide ancient by metalworking ages such as the Stone, Bronze, and Iron Age.  Metallurgy provided usages and advancements in the production of weapons and armor, tools, utensils, … Continue reading

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1.5 Million – 400,000 Years Ago: Fire Power

At some point in history there had to be one initial crucial step that separated humans from the other animals in our journey to becoming the dominant species on this planet.  I will call that point the beginning of science … Continue reading

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1610: The Starry Messenger

The invention of the telescope by Dutch spectacle makers in 1608, and vastly improved upon by Galileo two years later, provided the tool for some of the most revolutionary and groundbreaking discoveries in the history of science. Published by Galileo … Continue reading

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A Spirited Attack on the Holy Spirit

The Holy Spirit is an elusive enigma. The Holy Spirit – one of three different yet same incarnations of the one true God (dwell on that paradoxical nonsense for a moment) – is a central figure in the Christian Holy … Continue reading

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The Origins of Religion Part 5: The Benefits of Early Religion

We’ve seen that religion provided many beneficial functions for prescientific peoples such as providing a completed – even if inaccurate – a sense of cause and effect for phenomena they did not and at the time could not understand, and … Continue reading

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The Origins of Religion Part 4: Social Order and Stability

The need for social order and stability became an urgent and novel problem for large groups of people after the invention of agriculture. Prior to the invention of agriculture, people lived in bands numbering a few dozen up to no … Continue reading

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The Origins of Religion Part 3: Rituals

It seems evident through the discoveries of anthropologists that early human hunter-gather societies used primitive religion as a means of explaining and understanding phenomenon in the natural world.  They did this by invoking supernatural beings and spirits and attributing human … Continue reading

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